media

All in the Best Possible Taste: The Complexities of Social Class.

All in the Best Possible Taste: The Complexities of Social Class.

What is good taste? According to the artist-cum-social-commentator Grayson Perry, it is what is accepted by our tribe. In this case, our social class. His series of 6 tapestries named ‘The Vanity of Small Differences’ is a humorous and enlightening exploration of how aesthetic taste and social class are interwoven in modern Britain.

— Rebecca Appleton

Rethinking Smartphones

Rethinking Smartphones

Nowadays, it’s impossible to go to a coffee shop, walk along the street, or sit on a train without being surrounded by people staring at their phone screens. And no wonder!  Our smartphones enable us to engage with people and ideas from all over the world. At the same time, they are highly addictive and research shows they can detract from our social interactions. Is it time we broke up with our smartphones?

— Jessica Bennett

Serial killers: to show case or shut away?

Serial killers: to show case or shut away?

In today’s society, we are growing ever more fascinated with the terrifying presence of the serial killer. This fascination has been compelled by the vast number of media representations of real life serial killers. From books documenting their heinous crimes, through to films, documentaries and stories told by victims’ loved ones. Whilst it is undoubtedly important to make people aware of the existence of such dangerous individuals, this article asks whether we should be concerned with the way serial killers depicted. They are frequently sexualised and glamorised in media representations, whilst sensationalism plays a large role in invoking the horror we feel toward them. Together with serial killers desires for notoriety, the vulnerability of some social groups yet increasingly ready access to potentially triggering content, this article will explore problems and potential solutions that could be applied to media representations of serial killers.

Communication : are we critics or consumers ?

Communication : are we critics or consumers ?

The way we communicate is ever-changing. Communication, from the moment we start to babble as infants, is an inevitable and natural human phenomenon. Of course, it evolves, changing with our evolution as a species just as naturally as language changes in us – as individuals – over the course of our lives. But although human communication is wedded to change, modern communication is changing in such rapid and unprecedented ways that it is both important and timely that we step back and take note.